Solid Waste Contacts

Eddie Blizzard
Superintendent
Biography
Phone: 256.912.0540
Email: ewblizz@scottsboro.org

Leslie Gray
Account Billing Manager
Phone: 256.912.0541
Email: les@scottsboro.org

Georgina Brizendine
Facilities Coordinator
Phone: 256.912.0543
Email: georginab@scottsboro.org

Management Plan
CITY OF SCOTTSBORO
SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN
SCOTTSBORO SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT
SCOTTSBORO, JACKSON COUNTY, ALABAMA
PROJECT NO.: 04-190315.03


Prepared for:

SCOTTSBORO SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT
206 ABBIE LANE
SCOTTSBORO, ALABAMA 35768


FEBRUARY 25, 2005


Prepared by:

HIGHLAND TECHNICAL SERVICES, INC.
528 MINERAL TRACE
BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA 35244
PHONE: (205) 985-4874       FAX: (205) 987-6080



Jason M. Hughes, P.G. (Project Geologist)
William W. Cooch, C.P.G., P.G. (Principal Geologist)





TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0
INTRODUCTION
1
2.0
ORIGIN, VOLUME, AND WEIGHT OF WASTE
1
(A)
1
(B)
2
(C)
2
3.0
COLLECTION AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS
2
(A)
2
(B)
2
(C)
3
(D)
3
4.0
SCOTTSBORO SOLID WASTE FACILITIES
3
(A)
3
(B)
3
(C)
4
(D)
4
(E)
4
(F)
4
5.0
RECYCLING PROGRAMS
5
(A)
5
(B)
6
(C)
7
(D)
7
(E)
8
(F)
8
(G)
8
(H)
9
6.0
PROCEDURES TO ELIMINATE OR PREVENT ILLEGAL DUMPS
9
7.0
ORIGIN, WEIGHT, AND VOLUME FOR THE LIFE OF THE SWMP
9
8.0
LOCAL GOVERNMENT PLANNING
11
(A)
11
(B)
11
(C)
11
(D)
12
(E)
13
(F)
14
9.0
AGREEMENTS/CONTRACTS GOVERNING BODIES
14
10.0
CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE OPERATOR
14
11.0
UTILIZING FACILITIES OUTSIDE JURISDICTION
15
12.0
FUTURE DISPOSAL FACILITIES
16
(A)
16
(B)
17
(C)
17
(D)
17
(E)
17
(F)
17
13.0
PLAN FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION
17
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A Documentation of Public Participation for SWMP Approval
APPENDIX B Full Cost Accounting Worksheet
APPENDIX C Local Government Adoption of the SWMP
APPENDIX D Top of Alabama Regional Council of Government Regional Solid Waste Needs Regional Assessment Report

1.0 INTRODUCTION


The City of Scottsboro, Alabama owns and operates permitted solid waste disposal facilities that collect and properly dispose of all manner of solid waste materials in accordance with the provisions of Act Number 89-824, Alabama Law, in concert with the provisions of Subtitle "D" of EPA Regulation, 40CFR 56-196, and Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) Administrative Code R. 334-13.

This document revises, amends, and extends the current Solid Waste Management Plan (SWMP) to assure operational facilities in full compliance with current Federal and State Laws applicable to owning, operating, and maintaining solid waste disposal facilities.

Further, this SWMP includes: 1} SWMP goals, recommended actions, and schedules for implementation to achieve SWMP goals; 2) Planning period for the SWMP; 3) A resolution passed by the local government approving the SWMP; and, 3) Proof of public notices, public meetings, public hearings, public comments and response to comments.

2.0 ORIGIN, VOLUME, AND WEIGHT OF WASTE


In May 1993, the Jackson County Commission adopted a Resolution to allow the City of Scottsboro (Scottsboro), Alabama to accept and dispose of solid waste from locations including Jackson, Madison, and DeKalb Counties. Presently, Scottsboro handles waste collected inside the Scottsboro City Limits, along with most of Jackson County's waste, and disposes of such waste materials at a permitted MSW landfill (Permit No. 36-02) located near the Martintown Community north of Scottsboro. Construction/Demolition (C/D) waste is disposed of at a permitted C/D landfill (Permit No 36-09) located in the northeast portion of The City of Scottsboro.

The following waste streams are generated by the City of Scottsboro. Future waste streams generated by an expanded service area are not expected to vary significantly from the following:

(A) HOUSEHOLD WASTE GENERATED FOR A GIVEN PERIOD

Refuse from residences, and similar customers in Scottsboro represent 18,545 tons per year of waste with approximately 50% of this stream being inert materials.

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(B) COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL WASTE GENERATED FOR A GIVEN PERIOD

Primary sources of waste generated from manufacturing operations and other business operations located within the Scottsboro service area account for 17,006 tons per year of waste with 60% of total volume being inert materials.

(C) ANY WASTE REQUIRING SPECIAL HANDLING

Scottsboro handles approximately 3,371 tons per year of bio-solids from Scottsboro's wastewater treatment facility.

The above described waste streams fall into two classifications: inert or sanitary. No infectious or hazardous waste materials are handled or disposed of through Scottsboro's solid waste disposal system.

3.0 COLLECTION AND TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS


Scottsboro maintains a multiple service collection system for waste generated within the city limits. There are no provisions to collect waste from the service area beyond the city limits. Waste from outside the city limits will be received only at the Scottsboro MSW landfill and Scottsboro C/D landfill. Solid waste is routinely collected in the following manner:

(A) HOUSEHOLD WASTE

The City of Scottsboro provides 65 and 95-gallon containers for curbside collection to residential customers. Household waste is collected once each week with auto collection vehicles. Once each week collection is also provided for limbs, grass clippings, leaves, debris, appliances, and other waste other than sanitary materials by means of knuckle boom trucks.

(B) COMMERCIAL WASTE FROM BUSINESSES, SHOPS, ETC. THAT IS NOT INDUSTRIAL WASTE

Small manufacturing and retail establishments, which generate commercial waste, primarily use cans, dumpsters, or roll-off containers, depending on volume and customer request. Frequency of collection is determined by customer needs and available 6 days of each week. Collection of commercial waste is accomplished through side loader, front-loader, and roll-off vehicles.

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(C) INDUSTRIAL SOLID WASTE

Industrial waste is collected in either front loaded dumpsters or roll-off collectors. Roll-off collectors may be stationary-compactor-loaded, self-contained compactors, or open-top containers. Industrial customers select the method of containerization that is best suited to a particular industrial operation.

(D) CONSTRUCTION/DEMOLITION WASTE

C/D waste is transported to the permitted disposal facility by the generator in vehicles owned by the generator. Scottsboro will provide open-top roll-off containers and knuckle boom trucks to the generator upon request.

4.0 SCOTTSBORO SOLID WASTE FACILITIES


(A) MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW) and
(B) INDUSTRIAL WASTE

The Scottsboro MSW Landfill consists of approximately 89 acres in total area located in Jackson County northeast of Scottsboro near the Martintown Community (Sections 20 & 29, T3S, R7E Jackson County, Alabama). Approximately 45 acres of this facility is closed with 26 acres permitted for current and future solid waste disposal. Approximately 18 acres of this facility is buffer and operational areas. The Scottsboro MSW Landfill (Permit No. 36-02) is permitted to accept non-hazardous municipal solid waste, industrial waste, and construction and demolition waste. The approved service area includes Jackson, Madison, and DeKalb counties of Alabama. This facility is approved to receive an average daily volume of 190 tons per day. The permit expiration date is January 15, 2009.

This facility currently receives waste, as described in Section 1.0, into a ten-acre permitted MSW compatible lined cell with leachate collection systems. Remaining capacity in this cell is projected to be approximately 6-12 months. The second ten-acre lined cell is under construction and should be completed fourth quarter 2004. A vertical expansion for 6.7 acres of disposal area overlying the previously closed portion of the landfill is permitted for the disposal of C/D type waste. Liner requirements for this area should be completed by October 2004. The estimated remaining permitted capacity of the Scottsboro Landfill is approximately 10-15 years.
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(C) SCOTTSBORO C/D LANDFILL

The Scottsboro C/D Landfill consists of approximately 39 acres and located in northeast Scottsboro at US Highway 72 at Alabama Highway 279. The site is specifically located in the Northwest 1/4 of Section 15 and Northeast 1/4 of Section 16 Township 4 South, Range 6 East, Jackson County. The Scottsboro C/D Landfill permit number is 36-09 and permitted to accept non-hazardous C/D wastes, including scrap lumber, lawn debris waste, stumps, carpet remnants, yam, bedding, paper, cardboard, sand, gravel, concrete blocks, concrete, steel, aluminum, sheet rock, shingles, clothing and empty containers. The approved service area for this facility is the City of Scottsboro and the Alabama counties of Jackson, Madison and Dekalb. This facility is approved to receive an average daily volume of 120 tons per day.

At this time this facility only accepts carpet remnants, yarn, and relatively small amounts of cardboard. The above-referenced material is baled at a baling/recycling building located within the 39-acre footprint and disposed of in the C/D cell. Based on current disposal volume, the remaining permitted capacity of the Scottsboro C/D Landfill is projected to be approximately 8-15 years.

(D) COMPOSTING FACILITIES

The City of Scottsboro does not have a composting facility separate from the Scottsboro landfill. Approximately 40% of the biosolids from the Scottsboro wastewater treatment plant are mixed with wood shavings into windrows that are turned periodically until desired product is achieved. This mixture is stored on site in static piles at the Scottsboro MSW landfill and used for soil enhancement for grass cover growth on intermediate covered areas of the Scottsboro landfill.

(E) INCINERATORS

The City of Scottsboro does not have any incinerator facilities.

(F) RECYCLING CENTERS

The City of Scottsboro has an 11,000 square foot fully enclosed building located at 27150 John T Reid Parkway in northeast Scottsboro. The recycling center is specifically located at US Highway 72 at Alabama Highway 279 within the Northwest 1/4 of Section 15 & Northeast 1/4 of Section 16 Township 4 South, Range 6 East, Jackson County. This facility meets Alabama Department of Public Health regulations and standards for a waste transfer station and is used

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to segregate aluminum, baled cardboard, newspaper, plastic, paint, and waste oil. This facility also bales carpet remnants and yam and is also used as a truck washing facility for Solid Waste vehicles. The facility is served by the Scottsboro Sewer System and disposes all non-recyclables to other permitted facilities. The baling/recycling center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

5.0 RECYCLING PROGRAMS


(A) CURRENT RECYCLING PROGRAMS

A convenient drop is located at the Scottsboro Recreation Center located in the central portion of Scottsboro. This site has a compartmented, self-contained, container for cardboard, newspaper, aluminum, and plastic and accessible 24 hours per day. All of the above-referenced items are transported to the baling/recycling center mentioned in Section 3(f). The Baling/recycling center is open to the public Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. This site accepts cardboard, plastic, aluminum, metal, newspaper, paint, and used oil. The City of Scottsboro offers free cardboard pickup to all commercial and industrial businesses that desire to participate. These generators are required to clean all other debris from cardboard and stage it in an area accessible to a rear loader truck with frequency of service based on customer needs. Twenty and forty-yard open top containers are provided to larger industries to collect clean cardboard at no charge to the customer with frequency of pickups based on industry request. All recyclables collected by these means are segregated, baled, and sold. Used paint is redistributed to anyone that may have a beneficial use. Used oil is burned for beneficial use as heating fuel at the municipal maintenance shop.

Local commercial and industrial companies have contracts with cardboard and metal haulers to handle such recyclables. Some contractors offer balers to companies to bale their cardboard, and in return, the company allows the contractor to haul the baled cardboard for a percentage of the sale profit. Steel vendors set trailer containers for aluminum, copper and other ferrous materials, with companies receiving the blue sheet value of these recyclables. Some local companies offer to sale their recyclable waste to other companies for use in their manufacturing processes. Many companies reuse paper products and have waste such as pallets rebuiit for continued use.

Page 5

The Scottsboro- landfill accepts approximately 3,371 tons of bio-solids each year. Approximately 40% of bio-solid material is mixed with chipped wood waste that is transported to the MSW landfill. This mixture is placed into windrows that are turned periodically until desired product is achieved. This mixture is stored on site in static piles at the Scottsboro landfill and used for soil enhancement for grass cover growth on intermediate covered areas of the Scottsboro MSW landfill. All large metal items that are received at the Scottsboro landfill are removed from the waste stream with a track loader into a 40-yard container and subsequently sold as needed.

The City of Scottsboro collects approximately 1,395 tons of leaves per year. This waste is redistributed to residents within the city limits for gardening or soil amendment. Remaining portions are static piled at the Scottsboro Street department and given to the public upon demand.

(B) PLANNED RECYCLING PROGRAMS

Currently, the City of Scottsboro does not have any new recycling programs planned beyond the previously described programs. Local commercial and industrial businesses have in-house recycling efforts that reduce waste according to their operations. Table 1 reflects materials and volumes of recycling efforts in the City of Scottsboro (totals are in tons per year). The City of Scottsboro along with commercial and industrial business will continue to seek markets for recyclables that are feasible and economical.

Table 1 - Materials and Volumes of Recycling Efforts in Tons 2003
Recyclables
Scottsboro's Commercial
Scottsboro's Industry
City of
Scottsboro
Municipality
Totals
Cardboard
2,327
1,694
538
4,559
Newspaper
182
0
10
192
Paper
0
88
0.2
88
Aluminum
176
1,412
0.2
1,588
Copper
156
300
0.01
456
Steel
26
5,606
52
5,684
Plastic
1
2,406
0.2
2,407
Wood Waste
0
449
157
606
Yard Waste
0
0
1,395
1,395
Biosolids
0
0
1,348
1,348
Totals
2,868
11,955
3,500
18,323
Based on information provided by City of Scottsboro Solid Waste Department

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(C) 25% RECYCLING GOAL

According to collection, disposal, and recycling volumes in the local area, the 25% recycling goal has been achieved and exceeded. Table 2 indicates volumes and percentages of known waste generated and recycled in this area (numbers are in tons per year). The City of Scottsboro will continue to work with the manufacturing and service industry to reduce waste disposed at landfill facilities.

Table 2 - Volumes and Percentages of Known Waste Generated in Tons year 2003
Waste Generated
Waste Recycled
Percentage Waste Recycled
56,856
32%
18,323
Based on information provided by City of Scottsboro Solid Waste Department

(D) BENEFITS OF THE RECYCLING PROGRAM

Benefits of the recycling program include natural resource conservation, economic savings, job production, and reduced environmental impact. The two most notable advantages of the recycling program in Scottsboro are landfill disposal area conservation and cost savings to generators. Cardboard and newspaper, for instance, are formed into bales weighing an average of 1,200 pounds each and having a volume of approximately 1.6 cubic yards. In Scottsboro, approximately 4,559 tons of cardboard and newspaper are baled and sold per year. Based on the volume of each bale, these bales would fill 12,000 to 13,000 cubic yards of landfill air space. Depending on the compaction methods and machinery at the landfill, compaction rates of cardboard mixed with other waste could potentially be less than 600 lblber cubic yard, decreasing air space even greater.

Cost savings to the generator can be described by using the example of one local grocery store's data for cardboard recycling. Using the same weight figures as described above, the local store bales approximately 364 bales of cardboard per year, which is approximately 218 tons per year. Assuming un-compacted waste weighs approximately 300 lbs per cubic yard, it would require 1448 cubic yards of disposal space. The volume described would require approximately four waste pick-ups per week using an eight cubic yard container to dispose of this volume. The local collection fee on an eight cubic yard dumpster is approximately $250.00 for four pickups per week, resulting in cost savings to this local grocery store of approximately $13,000 dollars per year plus a percentage of profit of the cardboard sold.

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(E) METHODS OF COLLECTING RECYCLABLE WASTE

Methods of collecting recyclables are similar in nature in this area. Nearly 100% of all recyclables are stored on site in bales, open top containers (roll off boxes, transfer trailers), enclosed containers (compactor boxes, box trailers) or other designated areas on generator property. The City of Scottsboro uses roll off trucks, vacuum trucks, and a rear loader truck to collect and haul recyclables. Private haulers use roll off trucks and tractor-trailers to haul collected recyclables. Roll off trucks hoist the roll off boxes onto the truck, while tractor-trailers are loaded with forklifts.

(F) SORTING RECYCLABLES

Most recyclables are totally separated or slightly commingled before they reach the recycling facilities or end user. Cardboard, for instance, is normally baled at the point of generation and stored on-site for pickup, [If not baled, cardboard is staged in a designated area in loose form or in open top roll off boxes until transported to a recycling facility. Metal is normally commingled to some degree and sorted when it reaches the recycling site. The largest plastic producer in this area ships all waste plastic in loose form to the end-user presorted. Residential yard waste is segregated at the designated staging area by the collector and hauled in loose form.

Heavy machinery is normally used to extract wood, metal, and yard waste from waste streams at the point of generation or at the recycling facility. Hand sorting of materials is done at some manufacturing facilities before the recyclable reaches the waste stream and at some of the recycling facilities.

Cardboard, newspaper, plastic, steel, copper, and aluminum are sold to recyclers or brokers to be redistributed to end-user. Wood and paper wastes are refurbished in or out of house and reused in the specific facility processes. Compost processed by City of Scottsboro remains in the Scottsboro landfill facility and used as a soil amendment. Yard waste and paint are provided to residents to reuse, while used oil is used as heating fuel by the City of Scottsboro.

(G) GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION WITH OTHERS

At this time, there is no participation between the local government and any other government agencies in the form of a recycling program. Local government does issue business licenses and franchise licenses to recyclers.

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(H) COMPOSTING

Composting is considered an alternative to achieving the 25% reduction goal. The City of Scottsboro currently composts approximately 1,505 tons of compost per year and will continue such efforts. It is possible that production could be increased with minor resources.

6.0 PROCEDURES TO ELIMINATE OR PREVENT ILLEGAL DUMPS


The City of Scottsboro has ordinances that describe and identify illegal dumps that create a danger to public health, safety and welfare and detracts from orderliness and beauty of the area. Any person can make a complaint to City officials concerning illegal dumps. An appointed authority of the City of Scottsboro investigates all complaints. Upon inspection of the site, landowners or persons in control of the property are given 7 days (in extreme cases, a reasonable period) to clean up the property. A letter is then mailed io the offender to outline the severity of the crime and penalties including possible liens on property, and/or arrest or civil litigation. Any person or persons violating provisions of this law shall be deemed guilty of misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof, shall be fined up to $500.00.

The City of Scottsboro has mandatory garbage service laws that require all residents and businesses within the boundaries of Scottsboro to participate. The City of Scottsboro provides a variety of pickup services for residents and businesses (commercial & industrial) throughout the area as described in Section 2.0.

7.0 ORIGIN, WEIGHT, AND VOLUME FOR THE LIFE OF THE SWMP


Residents, contractors, commercial, and industrial establishments produce the majority of waste in the City of Scottsboro. Table 3 depicts weight volume of waste generated during the 2003 annual period. The Scottsboro area has experienced residential and commercial growth over the past 10 years, but industrial growth has diminished over time. Based on current volumes, solid waste generation has actually reduced by approximately 5% during the past five years. Table 3A provides the projected generated waste volume per customer (i.e. Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Customers) over the 10 year SWMP period based on previous projections of approximately 2% per year. Table 3B provides the projected generated waste volume per capita over the 10 year SWMP period. The Full Cost Accounting Worksheet also

Page 9

provides the FY 2003 waste generation. Population and customer projections utilized for the Tables and projections are provided in Section 8 (d).

Table 3. Weight Volume of Waste Generated Annually (Tons)
Residential
Commercial
Industrial
Contractors
Total
FY 2003
20,993
10,264
24,639
960
56,856
Based on information provided by City of Scottsboro Solid Waste Department

Table 3A. Weight Volume of Waste Generated Per Customer- Life of SWMP
Year
Customers
Total Tons
Tons per Customer
2003
7,140
56,856
7.96
2004
7,200
56,287
7.82
2005
7,260
55,725
7.67
2006
7,320
55,167
7.54
2007
7,380
54,616
7.40
2008
7,440
54,069
7.27
2009
7,500
53,529
7.14
2010
7,560
52,994
7.01
2011
7,620
52,464
6.89
2012
7,680
51,939
6.76
2013
7,740
51,367
6.63
Based on information provided by City of Scottsboro Solid Waste Department

Table 3A. Weight Volume of Waste Generated Per Capita- Life of SWMP
Year
Population
Total Tons
Tons per Person
2003
15,400
56,856
3.69
2004
15,554
56,287
3.61
2005
15,709
55,725
3.55
2006
15,866
55,167
3.48
2007
16,025
54,616
3.41
2008
16,185
54,069
3.34
2009
16,347
53,529
3.27
2010
16,510
52,994
3.21
2011
16,675
52,464
3.15
2012
16,842
51,939
3.08
2013
17,010
51,367
3.02
Based on information provided by City of Scottsboro Solid Waste Department

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8.0 LOCAL GOVERNMENT PLANNING

In 1996, the City of Scottsboro formed a Solid Waste Authority to govern and manage the solid waste needs of the City of Scottsboro. The Solid Waste Authority consists of an elected 5-member board that studies and addresses such needs. Plans for future waste demands are in accordance with local, regional, and state plans.

(A) CAPACITY ASSURANCE

The Solid Waste Authority (SSWD) with allegiance to the City has financed funds to secure land, equipment, and infrastructure to handle the solid waste needs of the City of Scottsboro for the next ten years. In the event that landfill capacity expires before this period, the SSWD owns and operates a baling/recycling facility that is designed to meet the regulatory requirements of a transfer station [Section 3(f)]- This facility could adequately redirect waste flow to a regional landfill, if needed. Additional solid waste systems will be evaluated according to procedures provided in this SWMP in the event that the city requires additional solid waste disposal options.

(B) FULL COST ACCOUNTING

The City of Scottsboro yearly budget provides money to fund operations described in this SWMP. Refer to the Full Cost Accounting Worksheet in Appendix B.

(C) ZONING CONSIDERATIONS

The City of Scottsboro has a planning commission made of six members and three ex officio members. The Mayor chooses five members of the six-member board and the council members select the remaining seat. The five members selected by the Mayor have a 6-year term and the member selected by the council has 4-year term. The three ex officio members are made up of one department head, one councilperson, and the Mayor (The mayor has the authority to select someone for his or her seat on the commission). It is the responsibility of this commission to ensure all new developments meet the requirements and guidelines of local zoning, including setbacks, roads, parking, drainage, traffic flow, maneuvering, structures, building codes, utilities, etc. The Zoning Commission then makes recommendations to the City Council regarding land usage and site approval plans.

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The City of Scottsboro also has a board of zoning adjustment composed of seven members: five active and two alternates. These members are selected by the city council with term lengths coinciding with the elected council's term. The board of zoning adjustment has authority to relieve or vary ordinances concerning zoning within the City of Scottsboro.

Public notices of all planning commission meeting and board zoning adjustment meetings are published in a local paper for public input. The planning commission and the board of zoning adjustment meet the first Tuesday of every month.

(D) POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT ESTIMATES

According to the local Jackson County Economic Development Authority (EDA), the City of Scottsboro's population in 2004 is 15,400. This population is derived from the economist model for the State of Alabama. National population census recorded by the local city planner indicates the population within the city limits of Scottsboro is as follows:

Table 4 population Increase 1980 to 2003
Year
Population
Percent Increase/Decrease
1980
14,758
1990
13,786
6.5% Decrease
2000
14,762
6.6% Increase
2003
15,400
4.1% Increase
Based on information provided by EDA

Based on the Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) ten-year population increase of 9.6%, the following population projection is provided in Table 4A:

Table 4A Projected Population increase 2004-2013
Year
Population
Percent Increase/Decrease
2003
15,400
1% Increase
2004
15,554
1% Increase
2005
15,709
1% Increase
2006
15,866
1% Increase
2007
16,025
1% Increase
2008
16,185
1% Increase
2009
16,347
1% Increase
2010
16,510
1% Increase
2011
16,675
1% Increase
2012
16,842
1% Increase
2013
17,010
1% Increase
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The Scottsboro city planner indicates that approximately 60 single family housing building permits are applied for annually. This increase of development could stem from single-family growth. Records indicate that commercial growth has increased by 10% over the past ten years. The local EDA estimates along that residential and commercial growth will continue growth at a 10% increase in addition to an increase industrial development. The Top of Alabama Regional Council of Governments (TARCOG) projects a 9.6% population increase, which is consistent with the Jackson County EDA projection of 10%.

Based on review of available data, the number of solid waste customers for all classifications (i.e. Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Customers) is also expected to increase at a projected rate of 1% per year. The projected number of solid waste customers is provided in Table 3B.

Table 4B Projected Solid Waste Customer Increase 2004-2013
Year
Customers
Percent Increase/Decrease
2004
7,200
1% Increase
2005
7,260
1% Increase
2006
7,320
1% Increase
2007
7,380
1% Increase
2008
7,440
1% Increase
2009
7,500
1% Increase
2010
7,560
1% Increase
2011
7,620
1% Increase
2012
7,680
1% Increase
2013
7,740
1% Increase


(E) ECONOMICS OF LOCAL AREA The local area has lost significant jobs in industrial and manufacturing sectors over the past ten years. Despite the industrial downturn, the City of Scottsboro has reclaimed some of those jobs in other manufacturing processes during this period. The city has also experienced residential and commercial growth as described in Section 7(e). The local EDA estimates that residential and commercial growth will continue in addition to increasing industrial development. City of Scottsboro revenue has increased over the past ten years from this commercial growth.

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The textile and apparel related employment base in Jackson County that once was a robust entry level/multiple family member job sector, continues to be eroded by foreign marketing pressures and corporate off-shore relocations. Related plant closings during 2002 took an estimated 1,000+ such jobs from the district through these slow attrition/phase-downs. Jackson County will loose over 400 jobs, between Pillowtex's closing, and other attritions. As a result, Jackson County's 2002 annual unemployment rate average of 8.4 percent was well in excess of the stale's 5.9 percent average; and, their June 2003 unemployment rate of 8.7 percent was over 55 percent above the statewide average.

(F) METHODS TO PROTECT AIR, WATER, AND NATURAL RESOURCES

The Solid Waste authority adheres to all local, State and Federal regulatory guidelines that pertain to air, water and natural resources. The protections in-place at solid waste facilities meet and exceed the current requirements set forth in all required environmental permitting and guidance. The specific requirements, and Scottsboro's compliance methods, included in permits and compliance plans are to varying in scope to provide in this document. However, all environmental permits, compliance monitoring information, and protection methods are, and will continue to be, maintained at Scottsboro Solid Waste facilities. All environmental records and protection methods are also available for review at the ADEM offices in Montgomery, Alabama.. The environmental protection strategies currently in place at Scottsboro's solid waste facilities will continue as in the past with enhancements and improvements under constant evaluation.

9.0 AGREEMENTS/CONTRACTS GOVERNING BODIES


The City of Scottsboro and Jackson County entered a 10-year solid waste agreement in 1995. The agreement consisted of the City of Scottsboro accepting Jackson County's waste at its landfill or other facilities for the agreement period. Negotiations are currently being considered to continue or extend the existing contract beyond the ten-year contract period. The SWMP will be updated as needed in accordance with the procedures outlined in this SWMP to include disposal agreements.

10.0 CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE OPERATOR


At the time of SWMP preparation, the City of Scottsboro does not have any agreements with private operators for the collection, transportation, processing, composting or disposal of solid

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waste. Based on information provided in this SWMP, the City of Scottsboro does not foresee the need to contract with private companies within this SWMP period. However, should the need arise for private contract, the City will provide for public participation in evaluation of these agreements.

11.0 UTILIZING FACILITIES OUTSIDE JURISDICTION


This SWMP does not propose to use solid waste facilities outside the local government jurisdiction. Again, additional solid waste disposal systems are not proposed during the 10-year SWMP based on current and predicted solid waste disposal needs assessments. If and when landfill space is depleted in the future, outside locations will be considered including other permitted landfills. The following is a discussion of the findings of the TARCOG Regional Solid Waste Needs Assessment. The TARCOG Regional Solid Waste Needs Assessment Report is provided in Appendix D.

The ultimate statutory objective of the TARCOG Solid Waste Needs Assessment was to determine the degree to which each county within the TARCOG Region had adequate solid waste facilities and services to satisfy local needs. Given the extensive limitations on existing solid waste data, the lack of established legal precedent addressing the application of interstate commerce laws on the established solid waste permitting practices in Alabama, and the lack of dedicated funds to finance solid waste planning and data collection efforts, the statutory objective of the TARCOG report was inconclusive. TARCOG implied that currently each County has at least two to three times the amount of municipal landfill storage capacity that it needs through the year 2010. However, that conclusion is based on a number of questionable assumptions and data estimates that weaken the foundation of the entire analysis. Should any one of the underlying assumptions discussed in the TARCOG report prove to be inaccurate, the results could change significantly. Before drawing any firm conclusions regarding solid waste management needs for any local government, it is important to define the needs that should be addressed. Solid waste management needs are not limited to disposal capacity. Many local governments are as concerned about the potential future cost of solid waste disposal as they are about landfill disposal capacity. While it is possible to collect and compile information regarding current disposal costs, the information needed to assess future costs is not available. Such an analysis also would require detailed data regarding the composition of the waste stream as well as data

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on historic trends in per capita waste generation, recycling activity, nonresidential waste stream volumes, and landfill disposal capacities-none of which is readily available today.

Solid waste management is a critical issue affecting the future sustainability of our society and our economy. AH of Alabama's 12 regional councils take these issues seriously and are united in their desire to participate in the solid waste planning process. Unfortunately, no dedicated funding is available to the regional councils to research and address these needs. Until such funding becomes available, the regions must rely on existing available data to satisfy their statutory obligations. Perhaps the current lacK of dedicated funding and reliable data to support solid waste management planning is the most critical solid waste management need that can be documented by this report.

Based on the limited data available and the assumptions discussed in this report, TARCOG concludes that it can identify no additional solid waste disposal need for any of the counties within the TARCOG Region. This statement does not mean that no solid waste needs exist within the region. It simply recognizes that the information necessary to make that determination does not currently exist, and the available information provides no conclusive rationale to establish that additional solid waste disposal needs exist.

12.0 FUTURE DISPOSAL FACILITIES


Additional solid waste disposal systems are not proposed during the 10-year SWMP based on current and predicted solid waste disposal needs assessments. If and when landfill space is depleted in the future, solid waste disposal systems including permitted landfills will be evaluated with regards to the SWMP. Currently, there are no plans for solid waste processing centers or disposal facilities in the City of Scottsboro. Future expansion of solid waste management systems must consider the following factors prior to approval by the local governing authority. The City of Scottsboro will analyze any proposed facility with regard to the six criteria found "in Code of Alabama 1975, 22-27-48(a), and further described as follows:

(A) PROPOSAL CONSISTENCY WITH THE SWMP

The City of Scottsboro shall review any proposal to determine if the scope and purpose of a proposed solid waste system is consistent with the current SWMP. If the proposal is not consistent with the SWMP, then the proposal shall be denied.
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(B) RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND DEVELOPMENT

The City of Scottsboro engineering department should be consulted as to the relationship of the proposed solid waste management system to existing or proposed developments and or roads leading to the proposed facility. Increased traffic counts and load limits should be considered.

(C) LOCATION RELATIONSHIP TO EXISTING AND FUTURE INDUSTRIAL AREAS

The City of Scottsboro should consider the location of proposed solid waste management systems in relationship to existing or proposed industrial facilities that generate solid waste.

(D) COSTS, AVAILABILITY, AND IMPROVEMENTS

The City of Scottsboro should consider the location of proposed solid waste management systems in relationship to existing or proposed industrial facilities that generate solid waste.

(E) POTENTIAL HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS

The proposed solid waste management system must be designed to minimize the impacts to public health and safety.

(F) POTENTIAL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC IMPACT

The City of Scottsboro shall take into consideration the effects, positive or negative, of the proposed solid waste management system on the community, including changes in property values and social and community perception. These effects shall be weighed against the advantages the proposed facility will bring to the community.

13.0 PLAN FOR PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

In providing public notice of any application or proposal regarding any services described in the Solid Waste Management Plan, the local government will at a minimum hold at least one public hearing thereon, notice of the time and place of which shall be given by one publication in a newspaper of general circulation in the municipality and in the official gazette, if any, of the jurisdiction. Furthermore, such notice will be given at least 30 days but not more than 45 days

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prior to the proposed date of said hearing. Each notice published in compliance with this section will contain at a minimum a description of the proposed action to be considered, its relevance to and consistency with the local Solid Waste Management Plan and shall identify a contact person from whom interested persons can obtain additional information and can review copies of both the local plan and the application or proposal to be considered. All pertinent documents shall be available for inspection during normal business hours at a location readily accessible to the public. Within 90 days of receiving an application or proposal, the local governing body shall either approve the application or deny the application setting forth the reasons therefor. The failure of the local governing body to act on the proposal within 90 days of receiving the application shall constitute approval by said local governing body.

Following local review and approval of any proposal regarding services or activities described in the local solid waste management plan, the applicant will obtain a statement of consistency from the Regional Planning and Development Commission. Therein, the said commission will evaluate the proposal using the provisions of the current regional solid waste management needs assessment. In particular, the regional commission will evaluate the proposal as it relates to available existing capacity within the region and the projected lifetime of such capacity. The evaluation will also identify any proposed capacity which is in excess of expected regional needs. No statement of consistency shall be required for contracts exclusively for the collection or transportation of solid wastes. The implementation of plans required by this section will not apply to industrial landfills receiving wastes generated on site only by the permittee.

Upon approval of the SWMP, the City will consider appointing interested citizens from their respective districts to serve on a SWMP Citizen's Advisory Committee. Most citizen appointments will be made at the City Council's first meeting of each year. Announcements of vacancy on the Committee will be made in November of each year. Mid-year vacancies will be announced as they occur.

Generally, the purpose of the SWMP Citizen's Advisory Committee will be to review legislative requirements, demographic and geographic data, and the existing solid waste system; to critique the current system; to analyze alternatives to provide service; to review the ten year plan and develop suggestions; to participate in the recycling planning process; to assist in the public educational process for the implementation of recycling in the service area; to present periodic reports to the City Council; to review contractual agreements, and to perform other

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activities as needed. It should be noted that the Citizen Advisory Committee public participation differs from the public participation requirements set forth in the Act for approval of the SWMP. The committee is expected to consist of five members including citizen advisors from the following entities: 1) a recycling advocate (one member); 2} two members of the solid waste staff including at least one hauler; 3) business owner (one member); and, 4) a city citizen (one member). The required steps and time frame recommended before implementation of the Citizens Advisory Committee are included on the following page.

Recommended steps to Citizen Advisory Committee (CAC) formation:

DECISION
TIME FRAME SUBSEQUENT TO SWMP APPROVAL
Decide on CAC Fundamentals
1 to 2 Months
· Decide on CAC role (develop a role and relationship document)
· Decide on CAC size (5 Members Expected)
· Decide on CAC composition (who should be represented?)
· Decide on selection method (open invitation, or by invitation?)
· Decide on budget for CAC
· Decide who will facilitate the group for the short and long term
· Decide when to start forming CAC
CAC Creation Process
1 to 2 Months
· Extend invitations to join
· Select members and publicize
· Hold first CAC meeting
CAC Orientation and Initial Planning Strategy
1 up to 4 Months
· Orientation to the Solid Waste District and planning process
· Orientation to CAC role and function
· Decide on meeting schedule and location
· Decide on CAC by-laws
· Elect CAC leadership
CAC Committee Work Begins
2 to 4 Months
· Fully functional CAC
TOTAL TIME SCHEDULE
5 to 12 Months
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